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Review Of The Day
Undone
By John Colapinto

New Yorker staff writer and award-winning author Colapinto’s darkly witty and sordidly satirical tale features upstanding Jasper Ulrickson, a mystery writer enjoying modest success with a cozy series featuring a blind detective, until, while delivering their only child, his editor wife has a stroke that leaves her immobilized.

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top10-Humorous-Novels_f1.jpg Top 10 Humorous Fiction: 2016
By Donna Seaman

Booklist reviewers found much to laugh about, however painfully, in the short story collections and novels listed below, tales reviewed in the past year that audaciously or affectionately or wickedly skewer family life, love, age, trauma, social conventions, and cultural divides with wit, irony, empathy, and an appreciation for absurdity.

American Housewife. By Helen Ellis. 2016. Doubleday, $24 (9780385541039).

top10-Humorous-Novels-Youth_f1.jpg Top 10 Humorous Novels for Youth: 2016
By Sarah Hunter

This year’s top 10 humor titles, reviewed in Booklist between February 15, 2015, and February 1, 2016, have something for everyone, from the jaded teen to the manic preschooler who loves fart jokes. Whatever the shape of your funny bone, get ready to laugh.

The Astounding Broccoli Boy. By Frank Cottrell Boyce. 2015. HarperCollins/Walden Pond, $16.99 (9780062400178). Gr. 4–7.

column_at-leisure At Leisure with Joyce Saricks: Multicultural Memoirs
By Joyce Saricks

As our communities become more diverse, the publishing world has followed suit, making available a wide variety of titles across genres and formats. Multicultural literature has long been popular in our libraries. Some readers enjoy reading about a shared ethnic background, while others appreciate the opportunity to explore another culture. I last wrote about multicultural collections in 2011, and the world, along with the world of publishing, continues to change.

top10-Multicultural-Nonfiction-Youth_f1.jpg Top 10 Multicultural Nonfiction for Youth: 2016
By Ilene Cooper

These multicultural nonfiction titles, reviewed in Booklist between February 1, 2015, and January 2016 take readers on a trip through history and around the world to experience diversity.

Enchanted Air: Two Cultures, Two Wings. By Margarita Engle. Illus. by Edel Rodriguez. 2015. Atheneum, $17.99 (97814811435222). Gr. 5–8.

top10-Multicultural-Fiction-Youth_f1.jpgTop 10 Multicultural Fiction for Youth: 2016
By Ilene Cooper

These titles take readers around the world and into their own backyards. Circumstances may differ, but the characters’ hopes and struggles are universal. These books have been reviewed in Booklist between February 1, 2015, and January 2016.

Bayou Magic. By Jewel Parker Rhodes. 2015. Little, Brown, $17 (9780316224840). Gr. 4–7.

top10-Multicultural-NonFiction_f1.jpg Top 10 Multicultural Nonfiction: 2016
By Donna Seaman

The best works of multicultural nonfiction reviewed in Booklist between February 1, 2015, and January 2016 are written with valiant candor and breathtaking eloquence and cover a broad spectrum, from the ancient peoples of the Southwest to the experiences of African Americans and immigrants past and present.

Between the World and Me. By Ta-Nehisi Coates. 2015. Spiegel & Grau, $24 (9780812993547).

column_back-page The Back Page: Best Personal Reading, 2015
By Bill Ott

Here’s why January is among my favorite months: I don’t need to think of a topic for the Back Page, and I can rely on my colleagues to do most of the writing. That’s because January means, in addition to Top of the List and Editors’ Choice, the Back Page feature we call Best Personal Reading, in which we select our favorite book read (or listened to) in the last year on our own (not Booklist’s) time.

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